A top Trump economic adviser leaving the White House had ominous parting words - Business Insider
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'Everyone should be worried': A top Trump economic adviser set to leave the White House issued some ominous parting words

FILE PHOTO: Trump economic adviser Kevin Hassett gestures as he speaks during a news briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., September 10, 2018.  REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Kevin Hassett.
Reuters
  • White House economic adviser Kevin Hassett is set to leave the administration, and he had some parting words in a Washington Post interview on Monday.
  • "I think everyone should be worried about how this is going to turn out in the end, because it's a shock unlike anything we've ever seen," he said.
  • Hassett helped connect the administration's economic and health teams and coordinate their data analysis.
  • He was also criticized for publishing a chart that showed coronavirus deaths dropping to zero by mid-May.
  • Visit Business Insider's 真人百家家乐网站homepage for more stories.

Kevin Hassett, a top Trump economic adviser, is set to leave the White House after a three-month stint helping to manage the nation's economic recovery. But he had some ominous parting words.

"I think everyone should be worried about how this is going to turn out in the end, because it's a shock unlike anything we've ever seen," Hassett told The Washington Post on Monday.

Hassett previously served as the chair of the Council of Economic Advisers from September 2017 to June 2019. The outgoing adviser told the newspaper he was encouraged by the "massive" uptick in economic data, citing credit-card spending, which he said rivaled or outpaced last year in at least 17 states.

Hassett told The Post he was brought on board to shore up the administration's ability to sift through data, and he connected the White House economic and health teams, the newspaper reported.

"When I came back, nobody knew where the ventilators were or how many we were going to need — there were a million data-intensive questions I came back to help out with … They needed an extra set of hands," Hassett said. "Now, it's functioning as normally as possible because we've built the tools you need."

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He was criticized for publishing a chart that showed deaths from the coronavirus plummeting to zero by May 15. About 800 Americans are still dying each day from the virus.

Other top economic advisers to the administration have left in recent weeks, raising concerns that the White House could be short on experienced economists capable of helping restore the nation's economic health. 

They include Andrew Olmen, who was a deputy director of the White House National Economic Council, and Eric Ueland, the former White House director of legislative affairs.

Unemployment stands at 13.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It's the at the highest level since the Great Depression.

Read more: Morgan Stanley handpicks 10 stocks to buy now for the richest profits as travel and outdoor activities transform in the post-pandemic world

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